Secession lagniappe

Sorry for the long break since the last one of these, I just don’t really have the time to do them weekly, so here’s a Hail Mary request. If there is anyone out there who would be interested in doing a secession link round-up weekly, I’d love to hand it over. Ideally it would remain fairly long, with a good mix of news links, more idea-driven content, images, and videos, collected from around the web. I have a subsection of RSS feeds and Google alerts for the purpose and could get you started, though nothing would make me happier than for someone to make this project their own. Email us if you’re interested at [email protected]

Reason has a new video on the State of Jefferson:

With the feds grabbing Jeffersonian land right and left — with the support of city-slicker California legislators — who can blame them for wanting to take matters into their own hands? Related book recommendation h/t JJ

Bill Gertz reports the Chinese are very interested in the Hawaiian restoration movement:

Chinese threats to back several groups of Hawaiian independence activists who want to restore the islands’ constitutional monarchy, ousted in a U.S.-backed coup over a century ago, has raised concerns that military facilities on the strategic central Pacific archipelago are threatened at a time when the Obama administration is engaged in a major shift toward Asia as part of its military and diplomatic rebalance.

Michael Pillsbury, a Pentagon consultant and author of the recent book 100 Year Marathon, said Chinese military hawks, known as “ying pai,” told him they are ready to provide arms to Hawaiian independence activists in retaliation for U.S. arms sales to Taiwan. …

“A favorite comparison the ying pai has made to me is ‘How would the Pentagon like it if we provide arms to our friends in Hawaiian independence movement?’” he said. “I was incredulous because I had never heard of such a movement in Hawaii, but, after checking I met a few of them.”

Pillsbury said Chinese backing for the independence movement would be a concern. Some U.S. archival material shows U.S. authorities acted on their own in the 1898 annexation, he said, something Congress later investigated.

Let the record show that threats of Chinese support in no way alter this blog’s position in favor of Hawaiian restoration.

Spokane and the Tri-Cities are tired of the tyranny of Olympia and Seattle. Local paper endorses a split.

Mike Vanderboegh on the steps of the WA state capitol raising hell:

Ron Paul’s not shutting up

More talk about a “Third Reconstruction”

Anti-frackers threaten a lefty version of secession in Mora County, New Mexico

*****

Definitely don’t miss First Things’ symposium on American Christianity. Here’s the first essay, and Rod Dreher’s response

Went to an excellent talk at the National Interest last week by Lord Lothian on the legacy of colonial borders, here’s their write-up of his remarks

The New Inquiry on neoreaction and the occult

Tom Woods’s recent secession speech

Adam Gurri on trust in democracies:

One problem that will not go away is this: we live in a time in which numerous rival and incommensurable narratives flourish. These narratives are tied up in membership in particular communities, and they often play a part in defining people’s identities as well as their sense of purpose. The present state of things can be traced largely to the spread of the Internet and the media of the late twentieth century. The thread goes back further still, to the invention of the printing press, and the subsequent beginnings of mass literacy, and the Reformation.

Modern pluralism writ large, and liberal democracy, grew in the soil of this turmoil. But how it came about is less important than the simple fact that this conflict of visions cannot be done away with; it is and will remain the reality on the ground. This means that a democratic government will be responsive to at least some constituents who subscribe to a narrative that you may find repulsive. Similarly, it will be responsive to the constituents who share your narrative, which others may find repulsive. This is the gap at the heart of democracy, the one so many go mad trying to fill.If you let this gap define your entire view of democracy, or even a particular democracy, you will inevitably fall into pessimism and cynicism. This attitude is pervasive right now; we live in a time when negation has replaced aspiration as the primary driver of political activism. No small part of the problem comes from aspirations that demanded too much too quickly and for too little. Tired of seeing such cosmic demands disappointed, the public tips increasingly towardsopen revolt.

Rosenberg on Chaitgate:

For all I tend to find Chait’s vision of liberalism rather crabbed, there’s something idealistic about his conviction that reasonable debate will prevail promptly against the intransigence of history, without the added spurs of radicalism and intemperate language and positions. The current battles in certain sectors of the left have real costs in burned-out activists and alienated potential allies. But Chait is going to need better evidence if he wants to argue that what’s nice is a better, faster route to what’s right.

 *****

National Review on a “Singapore-style city state” for white South Africans. Punch line: Rich Lowry, my favorite young adult fiction author, wrote a Jaffaite biography of Lincoln and had a recent column going after campus “secessionists”

Grannies for Sarawak secession

Czech mayor floats secession if mining plans go forward in his town

Secession may be the best solution to Yemen crisis

How cantonization can save Israel

Ryukyu/Okinawan independence movement gaining steam (it’s a fair bet the Chinese are watching this one closely too)

Phnom Penh monastery ‘secedes‘ from the CPP:

Am Sam Ath, technical supervisor for rights group Licadho, also said that the city was scrutinizing the pagoda now—some 17 years after it was established—because the pagoda was supporting protesters, and not because of the recent murder.

He scoffed at the city spokesman’s suggestion that a secessionist movement was brewing there.

“They cannot use the word ‘secession’ for the pagoda; it is a serious word,” Mr. Sam Ath said. “Secession means the pagoda wants to separate from the state. But how can they separate when the monks have no weapons?”

Mr. Sam Ath said the new committee was further proof that the government feared losing control of the monkhood.

The BJP loses Delhi

Tobago devolution

Fiji to remove Union Jack from flag

Strong support for South Tyrol-Austria unification; Breton unification

Interesting interview with Birgitta Jonsdottir

Maori sovereignty dispute

Mozambique opposition party to submit secession proposal

Norks persuade Cambodia to ban “The Interview”

Free West Papua!

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